Writing a law school diversity statement

So when I wrote my DS I was sooo happy with it, but reading everyone elses it feels so inferior to me.

Writing a law school diversity statement

Examples of Successful Diversity Statements 13 June on ExamplesAdmissionsDiversity Statements Updated June 19, We've been asked to post examples of diversity statements, so here are a few to start. We plan on posting several more over the next few weeks. It is important to note that diversity statements are truly optional, and not everyone should write one.

Contrary to what you may have heard, it is not a missed opportunity to write more about yourself. In fact, we wrote a blog a few years ago on when you should write a diversity statement. We hope these are helpful! Example 1 I was raised by a single mother, but my home was filled with family.

My mother, sister, and I shared a room with two twin-size beds. My aunts, uncles, five cousins, and grandparents shared the two remaining bedrooms.

In total, there were thirteen people sharing a three-bedroom, one-bathroom home. For the children, the nonstop playtime and carefree memories mitigated the obstacles that came with our socioeconomic insufficiency.

For me, our tight-knit family and living situation made it much easier to overcome the absence of my father. My father represented many of the negative stereotypes that Mexican Americans and Mexican immigrants have to combat. His choices had an adverse impact on not only my family, but also our writing a law school diversity statement at large.

I was somewhat sheltered from learning too much about my father, but I knew enough to feel burdened with shame. In fact, that feeling was so strong that I became fixated on the goal of creating a life opposite to that which my father had built.

Should I Write A Diversity Statement? - LawSchooli

Pursuing a brighter future did not come without obstacles in my neighborhood and family. Rejecting the criminal element in our community required a deliberate choice to exclude myself from the majority and often made me feel left out. My family fully supported my goals, but their own education levels and unfamiliarity with the college admission process restricted the amount of guidance they were able to provide.

Counselors at my high school were overloaded by high dropout rates and unable to focus on college bound students. These processes seem basic to some, but can be overwhelming to a first-generation student to the point where it becomes easier to put it off or quit altogether.

I did not spend my entire youth in that overcrowded yet comforting home. But I still know what its like to feel insecure about where you come from and what you lack—it is something I will carry with me throughout my life and career.

My education and career goals have been shaped by my background, and I will continue to aim high despite the challenges that may come my way. Example 2 For as long as I can remember, I outwardly portrayed myself as a calm and controlled individual.

It is a true reflection of my demeanor, but it is the complete opposite of what I have lived throughout my childhood and adolescence. When I was in fourth grade, my father admitted to me that he was addicted to crack.

At the time I did not understand what crack addiction meant, but I was educated by his actions soon enough.

However, I do want you to be realistic– don’t write a diversity statement just to write one. Write one because, as a diverse person or one who can bring diversity to your prospective schools, you have something strong and meaningful to say. However, the diversity statement can be much more, well, personal than the personal statement– as such, your brainstorming should naturally be different along these lines as well. In last week’s post, I wrote some basic questions you should ask yourself when considering whether to write a diversity statement or not. Your brainstorming should stem from the answers from these questions. Last week, I covered what a diversity statement is and how to decide whether a diversity statement is right for benjaminpohle.com, for those of you who will be writing one, I will cover how to do it. Generally speaking, your diversity statement should be written very much like your personal statement.

Shortly after this confession, the family structure I knew and loved began to collapse. My neighborhood could be described as a breeding ground for gangs, drugs, violence, and anarchy.

writing a law school diversity statement

One of the few bright spots of growing up in my neighborhood is the chemistry children had with one another by having similar troubles at home. It was not uncommon for my neighborhood friends to have a drug abusing parent, a single parent household, alcoholic parents, or experience domestic violence.

How to Write a Diversity Statement. | The Advanced Edit | The Advanced Edit

I was not allowed to cross the street without their supervision due to gang members on the corner selling drugs, and playing outside at night was dangerous due to occasional shootings.

Growing up in a neighborhood like mine was a double edged sword; it was dangerous, but our common struggles made it easy to relate to one another. Living with a drug addicted parent was full of uncertainty and confusion.

There were many break-ins, but I always had a strange feeling about these break-ins because although valuables were stolen, certain sentimental items of value would remain untouched.

I did not learn until much later in life that my father was the one stealing from us. Eventually my mother left my father and moved out in the beginning of my seventh grade year.

My sister and I stayed with our father. In winter the heating bills went unpaid and the temperature in the house would drop to the low forties. My sister and I would walk to the local laundromat at night and warm our blankets and pillows in the dryer in order to have heat through the night.However, the diversity statement can be much more, well, personal than the personal statement– as such, your brainstorming should naturally be different along these lines as well.

In last week’s post, I wrote some basic questions you should ask yourself when considering whether to write a diversity statement or not. Your brainstorming should stem from the answers from these questions. Last week, I covered what a diversity statement is and how to decide whether a diversity statement is right for benjaminpohle.com, for those of you who will be writing one, I will cover how to do it.

Generally speaking, your diversity statement should be written very much like your personal statement. 3 Ways Personal, Diversity Statements Differ in Law School Applications Applicants should tailor each essay type to fit the proper length, subject matter and tone.

13 June on Examples, Admissions, Diversity Statements. Updated June 19, We've been asked to post examples of diversity statements, so here are a few to start.

We plan on posting several more over the next few weeks. It is important to note that diversity statements are truly optional, and not everyone should write one.

The first “before” and “after” pair is a general law school personal statement. The second “before” and “after” pair is a law school application diversity statement.

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Writing Personal Statements for Law School * The personal statement is your chance to. REFLECT. upon your life and show the law Diversity statement.

Addendum.

If You Didn’t Get the LSAT or Law School You Dreamed Of

Most law schools require a personal statement. Others may allow a diversity statement and/or an addendum. Submit. ALL.

Harvard Law School Diversity Statement Writing Service Help