In the great gatsby how does nick undergo profound change gatsby

Gatsby, in the summer months, was known far and wide for the extravagant parties he threw in which "men and girls came and went like moths among the whisperings and the champagne and the stars. His gatherings were lavishly catered serving two complete dinnersboasting not just a small combo of musicians, but a whole orchestra. The guests enjoyed themselves, flirting and dancing, until the wee hours of the morning.

In the great gatsby how does nick undergo profound change gatsby

In addition to its desolate feel and uniform grayness, this forlorn area is home to a decaying billboard that calls attention to itself. Depicted on the advertisement are the Eyes of Doctor T. Eckleburg, which are described as "blue and gigantic — their retinas are one yard high.

The two men are headed to New York when Tom insists they get off the train in order for Nick to "meet [his] girl. Tom chats briefly with Wilson about business matters. Myrtle, a sensuous, fleshy woman in her middle thirties, joins the men. Tom quietly informs her he wishes to see her and so she arranges to meet them shortly, leaving her husband under the pretense of visiting her sister in New York.

While on their way to Tom and Myrtle's apartment, Myrtle spies a man selling dogs and insists on having one. Once at the apartment, Myrtle phones her sister, Catherine, and her friends, the McKees, to join the party.

The six people spend the afternoon in a haze of drunkenness. As the afternoon wears on and she becomes increasingly intoxicated, Myrtle becomes more and more outspoken about her situation in life, her marriage, her impassioned first meeting with Tom, and finally, Tom's marriage.

In the great gatsby how does nick undergo profound change gatsby

Upon mentioning Daisy's name, Myrtle becomes enraged, shouting "Daisy" at the top of her lungs. Tom, incensed by this outburst, lashes out with his open hand and breaks Myrtle's nose in one "short deft movement.

The chapter ends with Nick seeing Mr. McKee home and then heading home himself. Analysis Whereas Chapter 1 ended with the mysterious Gatsby reaching out to his dream in the night, Chapter 2 opens with a striking contrast.

Nick tells us about a stretch of land lying "about half way between West Egg and New York" which is so desolate that it is merely a "valley of ashes — a fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into the ridges and hills and grotesque gardens; where ashes take the forms of houses.

The ashen quality of the community is reflected in every element — including the dilapidated billboard of Doctor T. Eckleburg, perhaps the second most memorable image in The Great Gatsby following closely behind the green light at the end of the dock.

In many regards, the mysterious eyes hovering above the valley of ashes serve as spiritual force. They are, as George Wilson says, the eyes of God.

The faceless eyes hover over all that goes on in the book — a book decidedly void of traditional spirituality. The eyes, in this sense, represent the lack of Godliness in the lives of the characters, and by extension, the society on which Fitzgerald comments.

The s, for a certain sect of society, were characterized by an increasing freedom and recklessness — Gatsby's parties are perfect testament to the growing debauchery of the upper class. Through Doctor Eckleburg's sign, Fitzgerald indicates that although people are turning away from traditional established morality and rules of socially acceptable behavior, neglecting to tend to their spiritual side, the eyes of God continue to watch all that passes.

Even though God's image may become increasingly removed from daily life just as the face surrounding Eckleburg's enormous eyes has faded and disappearedHis eyes continue to witness all that passes.

Through the eyes the reader has an implicit call to action, reconnecting with a lost spiritual connection. After Nick and Tom get off the train notice how Tom orders Nick around and announces what it is they are going to do; these are clear indicators of Tom's nature and continue to mark him as the story continuesthey proceed to George Wilson's repair garage.

Much can be learned about Wilson, as well as everyone trapped in the valley of ashes, through the brief exchange.

There is little about Wilson to indicate he will ever be anywhere but the desolate wasteland of the valley. His business totters on the brink of failure, and he seems ignorant of what goes on around him.

It is unlikely that he is, in Tom's elitist words, "so dumb he doesn't know he's alive," but he does seem trapped by an unnamable force. Myrtle Wilson appears in striking contrast to her husband. Although she does not possess the ethereal qualities of Daisy, in fact, she appears very much of the earth, she does possess a decided sensuality, as well a degree of ambition and drive that is conspicuously absent in her husband.

After a few attempts at social niceties showing that Myrtle, despite being trapped in a dead-end lifestyle, aspires in some sense to refinement and proprietyNick and Tom leave, with the understanding that Myrtle will soon join them to travel into the city to the apartment that Tom keeps for just such purposes.

It is worth noting, however, that Myrtle rides in a different train car from Tom and Nick, in accordance with Tom's desire to pander, in this small way, to the "sensibilities of those East Eggers who might be on the train. He is bold about his affair, not worrying that Daisy knows, but he sees the need to put up a pretense on the train, as if that one small gesture of discretion makes up for all the other ways in which he flaunts his affairs.

As soon as the group arrives in New York, Myrtle shows herself to be not nearly as nondescript as is her husband. She is, however, far from refined, despite how she may try.A summary of Chapter 3 in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Great Gatsby and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

The Great Gatsby Questions - Free download as Word Doc .doc /.docx), PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. The Great Gatsby Study Guide- IB English 1B/5(18). Nick's Character evolution: The Deluded Roaring 20's Nick Carraway, A man from out west is the narrator of this entire story.

He is a simple quite man when he moves to the East coast. Nick exposes Gatsby's obsession with a fantasy. The Daisy he loves no longer exists, and trying to reach five years back in time ends up killing him. You'd think that this lesson would make Nick wary of continually returning to the past.

The Great Gatsby: Nick versus Gatsby Mainframe computers analyze information and present it so that the observer is able to make accurate observations. In The Great Gatsby, written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the narrator, Nick Carraway, tells a story in which Jay Gatsby tries to attain happiness through wealth.

Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby follows Jay Gatsby, a man who orders his life around one desire: to be reunited with Daisy Buchanan, the love he lost five years earlier. Gatsby's quest leads him from poverty to wealth, into the arms of his beloved, and eventually to death.

The Great Gatsby Wiki / Changes and Transformation