Biography of roy lichtenstein an american pop artist

Roy Lichtenstein Biography Roy Lichtenstein Biography American pop artist Roy Lichtenstein used comic book-inspired imagery to parody and document modern society. Along with Andy Warhol, he developed what became the Pop Art movement, favoring multi media prints, screen prints, monumental paintings, sculptures and canvases for art. While painting in Cleveland he worked as a freelance designer, then taught at the State College in Oswego after moving to New York. Later he instructed at Rutgers University in New Jersey, Lichtenstein worked in a non-figurative Abstract Expressionist mode before ; then he began to use loosely handled cartoon images from bubble-gum wrappers, also re Interpreting paintings of the old West by Frederick Remington and others.

Biography of roy lichtenstein an american pop artist

(American, 1923–1997)

Brushstroke with Spatter Roy Lichtenstein Biography Roy Lichtenstein was an American pop artist best known for his boldly-colored parodies of comic strips and advertisements. In the s, Lichtenstein became a leading figure of the new Pop Art movement.

Inspired by advertisements and comic strips, Lichtenstein's bright, graphic works parodied American popular culture and the art world itself. He died in New York City on September 29, In his teens, he became interested in art.

He took watercolor classes at Parsons School of Design inand he took classes at the Art Students League instudying with American realist painter Reginald Marsh. His college studies were interrupted inwhen he was drafted and sent to Europe for World War II. After his wartime service, Lichtenstein returned to Ohio State in to finish his undergraduate degree and master's degree - both in fine arts.

He briefly taught at Ohio State before moving to Cleveland and working as a window-display designer for a department store, an industrial designer and a commercial-art instructor.

In the s, he often took his artistic subjects from mythology and from American history and folklore, and he painted those subjects in styles that paid homage to earlier art, from the 18th century through modernism.

Lichtenstein began experimenting with different subjects and methods in the early s, while he was teaching at Rutgers University. His newer work was both a commentary on American popular culture and a reaction to the recent success of Abstract Expressionist painting by artists like Jackson PollockMark RothkoJasper Johns and Willem de Kooning.

Instead of painting abstract, often subject-less canvases as Pollock and others had had done, Lichtenstein took his imagery directly from comic books and advertising. Rather than emphasize his painting process and his own inner, emotional life in his art, he mimicked his borrowed sources right down to an impersonal-looking stencil process that imitated the mechanical printing used for commercial art.

Lichtenstein's best-known work from this period is "Whaam! Other works of the s featured cartoon characters like Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck and advertisements for food and household products. He created a large-scale mural of a laughing young woman adapted from an image in a comic book for the New York State Pavilion of the World's Fair in New York City.

Lichtenstein became known for his deadpan humor and his slyly subversive way of building a signature body of work from mass-reproduced images. By the mids, he was nationally known and recognized as a leader in the Pop Art movement that also included Andy Warhol, James Rosenquist and Claes Oldenburg.

His art became increasingly popular with both collectors and influential art dealers like Leo Castelli, who showed Lichtenstein's work at his gallery for 30 years.

Like much Pop Art, it provoked debate over ideas of originality, consumerism and the fine line between fine art and entertainment. Later Career By the late s, Lichtenstein had stopped using comic book sources.

In the s his focus turned to creating paintings that referred to the art of early 20th century masters like PicassoHenri Matisse. In the s and '90s, he also painted representations of modern house interiors, brushstrokes and mirror reflections, all in his trademark, cartoon-like style.Roy Fox Lichtenstein (October 27, – September 29, ) was an American pop artist.

During the s, along with Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and James Rosenquist among others, he became a leading figure in the new art movement.

His work defined the premise of pop art through parody. Roy Lichtenstein.

Biography of roy lichtenstein an american pop artist

Roy Lichtenstein was an American pop artist best known for his boldly-colored parodies of comic strips and advertisements. Roy Lichtenstein was an American artist known for his paintings and prints which referenced commercial art and popular culture icons like Mickey Mouse.

Composed using Ben-Day dots—the method used by newspapers and comic strips to denote gradients and texture—Lichtenstein’s work mimicked the mechanical technique with his own hand on a much larger scale.

Roy Lichtenstein was one of the first American Pop artists to achieve widespread renown, and he became a lightning rod for criticism of the movement.

His early work ranged widely in style and subject matter, and displayed considerable understanding of modernist painting: Lichtenstein would often maintain that he was as interested in the abstract Place Of Birth: New York, NY.

Roy Fox Lichtenstein (; October 27, – September 29, ) was an American pop artist. During the s, along with Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and James Rosenquist among others, he became a leading figure in the new art movement. His work defined the premise of pop art through parody.

Roy Lichtenstein was an American pop artist best known for his boldly-colored parodies of comic strips and advertisements. Synopsis Roy Lichtenstein was born in New York City on October 27, , and grew up on Manhattan's Upper West Side.

Roy Lichtenstein: American Pop Artist, Comic-Strip Painter